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Elizabeth Spreadbury Lecture

20 Jan 2018

Previous Elizabeth Spreadbury Lectures

1991 Martin Rees Cambridge Learning about the Early Universe
1992 Neil Turok Cambridge Cosmological Defects and their Classical Analogues
1993 John Ellis CERN New Light on Dark Matter'
1994 John Barrow Sussex What is the Inflationary Universe?
1995 Alan Martin Durham The Wonder of Neutrinos in Physics and Astronomy
1996 Bernard Carr QMUL Dark Matter and Gravitational Lensing
1997 Ken Peach Edinburgh Space, Time and the Number of Protons in the Universe
1998 Malcolm Longair Cambridge The Enigma of the Cosmological Constant
1999 Chris Llewellyn-SmithUCL The Cosmic Role of CERN
2000 Alan Watson Leeds Quest for the Origin of the Highest Energy Cosmic Rays
2001 Jocelyn Bell-Burnell Bath Shakes, Quakes & Mountain Building; Physics of Pulsars
2002 Cecilia Jarlskog CERN Why dont Protons decay?
2003 David Wark Sussex/RAL Neutrinos from the Cosmos; near and far
2004 Ofer Lahav UCL Dark Matter, Dark Energy and the Accelerating Universe
2005 Ed Hinds ImperialIs the Electron Round?
2006 Carlos Frenk Durham Our Implausible Universe
2007 Jeff Forshaw Manchester Does there have to be a Higgs Boson?
2008 Richard S. Ellis Oxford Gravitational Lensing; Einstein's Unfinished Symphony
2009 Rolf Heuer CERN Shedding Light on the Dark Universe
2010 James Hough Glasgow The Detection and Cosmological Significance of Gravitational Waves
2011 Alan Shotter Edinburgh Nuclear Astrophysics - pathway to creation of the chemical elements
2012 Jon Butterworth UCL Results from the Large Hadron Collider and what they mean
2013 Simon WhiteMPI Garching Dark Matters
2014 George EfstathiouCambridge The Birth Of The Universe
2015 Jenny Thomas UCL Neutrino Oscillations At Work
2016 Chris Done Durham Black Holes: science fiction, fact or fantasy?
2017 Subir Sarkar Oxford/Copenhagen Cosmology beyond the standard model lecture notes