Seminars

: Alex Keshavarzi (Manchester) -- Physics A1/3

From Muon g-2 to proton EDM

The Muon g-2 Experiment at Fermilab has been an undeniable success, with its most recent results having an overall unprecedented precision of 190 parts-per-billion. The case for new physics rests upon the Standard Model (SM) prediction, also at sub-percent precision, where tensions exist between data-driven dispersive and lattice QCD evaluations of the hadronic vacuum polarisation (HVP) contributions. The former favours a signal of new physics at > 5 sigma when comparing the SM prediction to the Muon g-2 Experiment; the latter is in closer agreement with the experimental measurement. I will review the status of the Muon g-2 Experiment and the theoretical SM predictions, highlighting the efforts to resolve and understand the current discrepancies. I will then propose using the Muon g-2 Experiment's successful techniques to perform the first direct search for a proton EDM. This would improve on the current limit by at least 4 orders of magnitude and is the most promising effort to solve the strong CP problem. It will also probe axionic dark matter, CP-violation for baryon asymmetry, and new physics scenarios covering a wide range of energy scales and interactions.

News

New measurement of particle wobble hints at new physics

New measurement of particle wobble hints at new physics

A new, ultraprecise measurement of the subatomic muon particle’s anomalous magnetic moment, conducted at US-based Fermilab and involving researchers from UCL, reinforces a discrepancy between theory and experiment that physicists can’t explain, potentially hinting at new physics.

High Energy Physics

The UCL high energy physics group has 50 academic, research and technical staff and over 50 PhD students. We are one of the largest groups in the country with research areas spanning: theory/phenomenology, detector, software and accelerator R&D and analysis of data from the LHC, dark matter and neutrino experiments.

Seminars

: Alex Keshavarzi (Manchester) -- Physics A1/3

From Muon g-2 to proton EDM

The Muon g-2 Experiment at Fermilab has been an undeniable success, with its most recent results having an overall unprecedented precision of 190 parts-per-billion. The case for new physics rests upon the Standard Model (SM) prediction, also at sub-percent precision, where tensions exist between data-driven dispersive and lattice QCD evaluations of the hadronic vacuum polarisation (HVP) contributions. The former favours a signal of new physics at > 5 sigma when comparing the SM prediction to the Muon g-2 Experiment; the latter is in closer agreement with the experimental measurement. I will review the status of the Muon g-2 Experiment and the theoretical SM predictions, highlighting the efforts to resolve and understand the current discrepancies. I will then propose using the Muon g-2 Experiment's successful techniques to perform the first direct search for a proton EDM. This would improve on the current limit by at least 4 orders of magnitude and is the most promising effort to solve the strong CP problem. It will also probe axionic dark matter, CP-violation for baryon asymmetry, and new physics scenarios covering a wide range of energy scales and interactions.

: Paul Newman (Birmingham) -- Physics A1/3

The Electron-Ion Collider

An early perspective is presented on the Electron-Ion Collider, which is currently under intense development towards realisation in the early 2030s at the Brookhaven National Laboratory in the USA . After an introduction to Deep Inelastic Scattering, overviews of the physics motivation, accelerator and detector concepts are given. Finally, the status of the international ‘ePIC’ collaboration and its UK contributions are discussed.

News

New measurement of particle wobble hints at new physics

New measurement of particle wobble hints at new physics

A new, ultraprecise measurement of the subatomic muon particle’s anomalous magnetic moment, conducted at US-based Fermilab and involving researchers from UCL, reinforces a discrepancy between theory and experiment that physicists can’t explain, potentially hinting at new physics.

UCL HEP Research Fellowships

We are keen to support a limited number of strong candidates in applying for Research Fellowships. If your profile and interests match our activities, we would be very interested to hear from you.

A step closer in the quest for Higgs pair production at the LHC

The latest result in the search for Higgs pair production in ATLAS at the LHC, in the 4b final state, is now out:

https://lnkd.in/e6pdhj36

with big contributions from the UCL ATLAS team, including the co-editor of the journal publication.

Higgs pair production (the production of two Higgs bosons in a single proton-proton collision at the LHC) is a rare process that can shed light on the properties of the Higgs boson and particularly the Higgs field potential (the famous "Mexican hat"). The Electroweak Phase Transition, one of the most dramatic and defining moments in the evolution of our Universe, happened around 1 picosecond (one billionth of a millisecond!) after the Big Bang. The shape of the Higgs field potential is intricately linked to that moment.

New horizons opening in dark matter detection

New horizons opening in dark matter detection

Professors Chamkaur Ghag and Peter Barker (both UCL Physics & Astronomy) receive a major grant which builds on the work they have been carrying out within the Cosmoparticle Initiative.